Sunday, March 03, 2024

Sponsors

CT to Impose Fines on Uncooperative Travelers

As of July 17, the administration posted 22 states that meet the criteria as hot spot states — having daily increases in infection rates of 10% or more. And Lamont said he expects his list will cover more than half of all states at some point this week.

By comparison, Connecticut’s daily infection rates have been increasing for much of July at less than 1%.

Connecticut recorded another 162 positive coronavirus tests over the past weekend, bringing the statewide total to 48,055, according to the administration. Another 10 people died from the virus, which has claimed 4,406 Connecticut lives since the pandemic began.

Hospitalizations from COVID-19 in Connecticut dropped by 12 over the weekend, bringing the total down to 54.

Besides converting the advisory into an executive order — thereby giving it force of law — Lamont said those planning to visit or return to Connecticut will be mandated to fill out the form indicating the state they visited, the Connecticut address at which they will self-quarantine, and their personal contact information.

But the governor said that state health officials also will be stationed periodically at airports to ask people to show their forms.

“We know that COVID came to this country by airplane and we don’t want it to come by airplane again,” Lamont said during his briefing.

The order will include a $1,000 fine for those who violate the self-quarantine rule. “When we’re going to impose that fine — we’ll see,” the governor added cryptically.

As of July 17, the administration posted 22 states that meet the criteria as hot spot states — having daily increases in infection rates of 10% or more. And Lamont said he expects his list will cover more than half of all states at some point this week.

By comparison, Connecticut’s daily infection rates have been increasing for much of July at less than 1%.

Connecticut recorded another 162 positive coronavirus tests over the past weekend, bringing the statewide total to 48,055, according to the administration. Another 10 people died from the virus, which has claimed 4,406 Connecticut lives since the pandemic began.

Hospitalizations from COVID-19 in Connecticut dropped by 12 over the weekend, bringing the total down to 54.

Besides converting the advisory into an executive order — thereby giving it force of law — Lamont said those planning to visit or return to Connecticut will be mandated to fill out the form indicating the state they visited, the Connecticut address at which they will self-quarantine, and their personal contact information.

But the governor said that state health officials also will be stationed periodically at airports to ask people to show their forms.

“We know that COVID came to this country by airplane and we don’t want it to come by airplane again,” Lamont said during his briefing.

The order will include a $1,000 fine for those who violate the self-quarantine rule. “When we’re going to impose that fine — we’ll see,” the governor added cryptically.

Letter: In Favor of Insulin Cap

To the Editor:

More than 30 millions Americans have diabetes. In Connecticut, almost 9% of adults have been diagnosed as either a Type 1 or Type 2 diabetic, and another 83,000 or so are thought to have undiagnosed diabetes. For these people, insulin is as necessary as water, food, and air.

Yet from 2002 to 2013 the price of Insulin has almost tripled, making the life saving drug increasingly difficult to afford. For people with health insurance, the impact of this price inflation is minimal: however, those without insurance are often forced to put their life on the line by living without medication they desperately need. During the special session in Hartford, legislators will vote on a bill to cap the price of insulin.

The bill would ensure that Insulin costs no more than $50, and Insulin related supplies don’texceed a price of $100. This bill would increase the affordability of the lifesaving medication and would help Connecticut reduce the number of avoidable deaths.

The proposed bill could help Connecticut citizens avoid the life or death situation incurred wheen necessary medications become unaffordable. It is imperative that this bill is passed and the cycle of death because of inaccessible Insulin is broken.

Amy Ginzburg
Westport

Letter: Favors Police Accountability Bill

To the Editor:

Police brutality in Connecticut is a problem rarely discussed, but its ramifications are tragic and heartbreaking. In the past five years, there have been 21 use of force deaths, yet none of the officers involved have been charged with any crimes in relation to the deaths. In 2020 alone, 3 out of 4 police-related deaths were Black or Latinx men.

Kids as young as 15 are subject to police violence based on their race, and the people meant to protect them are failing them. Black lives matter and no one, regardless of the crime committed, deserves to lose their life in this way.

A new police accountability bill has been introduced and will be voted on during the special session. This bill is incredibly important, as it supports police reform in Connecticut. The bill dictates that officers will receive compulsory implicit bias training and mental health screenings. It will also reduce access to military-style equipment and mandate the use of body cameras. This will ensure the safety of our community and stop unnecessary deaths by police officers.

This police accountability bill is the first step on a longer road to justice, but it’s an important step. I encourage you to read about this bill and submit testimony to ensure it gets passed. To submit a written testimony, please email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Ruby Coleman
Westport

Letter: In Favor of Absentee Ballots

To the Editor:

I am writing in complete support of the expansion of the Connecticut absentee ballot program.  The upcoming special session of the Connecticut General Assembly includes a bill that would temporarily change some of Connecticut’s restrictions on absentee ballots to make it more accessible for the fall.  Undoubtedly, this year the election will be different then it has been in the past. 

This bill would expand the valid reasons as to why someone would send in an absentee ballot.  Instead of the options being limited to someone being out of town or because they are ill, residents will be able to mark COVID-19 as a reason for choosing to use an absentee ballot.  This would ensure the safety of all residents, while still ensuring that they will have their constitutional right to vote. 

While some opponents believe that absentee ballots will lead to voter fraud, this statement cannot be supported with actual facts.  Nationally, there are only seven to eight cases of voter fraud from mail in ballots a year.  In a year where there are going to be more security measures concerning voter fraud than ever, it is clear that expanding the absentee ballot program for the November election is more important than ever.

Katherine Simons
Westport

Monday, July 20, 2020


Westport Town Offices, Schools, & Senior Center are closed.
2 p.m. – 6 p.m. – Westport Library – Open for limited services
5 p.m. – 646-876-9923 ID:  89795967328# – Planning & Zoning Commission
5:30 p.m. – Wakeman Town Farm – All About Bees!
7 p.m. -Board of Education /POSTPONED to July 23

Westport Senior Center YouTube Channel
Westport Library Event Calendar
Westport Library YouTube Page
Earthplace YouTube Channel
Virtual Westport Museum for History & Culture
See more events: Celebrate Westport Calendar

Gottlieb: ‘Wishful Thinking Everyone Will Wear Mask’

“If we can come to a consensus about some reasonable measures that we all agree to take, we could potentially get this under control and keep it under control.”

Gottlieb said masks are an important first step, but he does not see enough of the population agreeing to wear masks.

“If 30% of the population won’t wear masks any- any time, and then you only have maybe 75% compliance among the other portion of the population because nobody is going to do everything all the time, that might not be enough mask-wearing to really get this fully under control,” he said.

Gottlieb warned there could be a surge in reports of post-viral syndromes that may be tied to the coronavirus, just as children prepare to return to school.

He said illnesses such as pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome, clusters of which have been reported in the United States, are currently being investigated.

Gottlieb said one study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated the illness occurred roughly 25 days after children displayed symptoms for the coronavirus.

“Given the fact that we’ve seen a spike in infections among kids, we would expect in about two or three weeks we might see a surge in these kinds of cases getting reported,” he said.

“That will be right about the time that we’re looking at sending kids back to school. So that could cause a lot of districts to become wary.”

“If we can come to a consensus about some reasonable measures that we all agree to take, we could potentially get this under control and keep it under control.”

Gottlieb said masks are an important first step, but he does not see enough of the population agreeing to wear masks.

“If 30% of the population won’t wear masks any- any time, and then you only have maybe 75% compliance among the other portion of the population because nobody is going to do everything all the time, that might not be enough mask-wearing to really get this fully under control,” he said.

Gottlieb warned there could be a surge in reports of post-viral syndromes that may be tied to the coronavirus, just as children prepare to return to school.

He said illnesses such as pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome, clusters of which have been reported in the United States, are currently being investigated.

Gottlieb said one study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated the illness occurred roughly 25 days after children displayed symptoms for the coronavirus.

“Given the fact that we’ve seen a spike in infections among kids, we would expect in about two or three weeks we might see a surge in these kinds of cases getting reported,” he said.

“That will be right about the time that we’re looking at sending kids back to school. So that could cause a lot of districts to become wary.”

Charles J.  Heiser, 87

While retired, he carved out a closing career in Westport real estate with Prudential. He was made a member of the Honors Circle Society and also became an Accredited Buyer Representative. Service before, during and after each sale became his hallmark.

He was a member of the National Association of Broadcasters, the Television/Radio Advertising Club, the National Association of Realtors, the Connecticut Association of Realtors and the Real Estate Buyer Agent Council.

As a community minded man, he was involved in the Good Shepherd House Soup Kitchens, an ardent supporter and fundraiser for Sunshine Kids, and participated in Hospital/Home Visitations to Ailing Patients.

He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Rose Blake Heiser, Weston and four children:  Jeanne Ann Heiser, East Norwalk, Kenneth C. Heiser (Ken) and his wife Jen, child Marshall Blake of Westport, Linda LaRusso and her husband William LaRusso, Norwalk, and Angela Rose Hare and her husband Timothy Hare, children Charley and Lucy, Shelton.

Chuck enjoyed evenings with Rose at Compo Beach watching the sunset, quality time with his grandkids often cheering them on at sporting events, and time at home tending his lawn with great pride.

He was an avid golfer, a coach to his children and grandchildren, and in his younger years a college baseball player. He was a person of quiet but strong faith, religious in his attendance at church and in his support of Notre Dame football.

Chuck made friends easily and often, always eager to express interest in the lives of others. He was loved by all who knew him, even briefly.    

He would want people to know that he cherished his faith and always strived to be a good son, husband, dad and grandpop. He would say – God bless you, love you, keep the faith and say your prayers.

Funeral services will be private to family Tuesday, July 21 at 10 a.m. at Assumption Church. Guests are welcome to attend the burial immediately following at 11:15 a.m. at Assumption Cemetery – 73 Greens Farms Road, Westport.

In lieu of flowers, please make a contribution to:  Assumption Church.

While retired, he carved out a closing career in Westport real estate with Prudential. He was made a member of the Honors Circle Society and also became an Accredited Buyer Representative. Service before, during and after each sale became his hallmark.

He was a member of the National Association of Broadcasters, the Television/Radio Advertising Club, the National Association of Realtors, the Connecticut Association of Realtors and the Real Estate Buyer Agent Council.

As a community minded man, he was involved in the Good Shepherd House Soup Kitchens, an ardent supporter and fundraiser for Sunshine Kids, and participated in Hospital/Home Visitations to Ailing Patients.

He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Rose Blake Heiser, Weston and four children:  Jeanne Ann Heiser, East Norwalk, Kenneth C. Heiser (Ken) and his wife Jen, child Marshall Blake of Westport, Linda LaRusso and her husband William LaRusso, Norwalk, and Angela Rose Hare and her husband Timothy Hare, children Charley and Lucy, Shelton.

Chuck enjoyed evenings with Rose at Compo Beach watching the sunset, quality time with his grandkids often cheering them on at sporting events, and time at home tending his lawn with great pride.

He was an avid golfer, a coach to his children and grandchildren, and in his younger years a college baseball player. He was a person of quiet but strong faith, religious in his attendance at church and in his support of Notre Dame football.

Chuck made friends easily and often, always eager to express interest in the lives of others. He was loved by all who knew him, even briefly.    

He would want people to know that he cherished his faith and always strived to be a good son, husband, dad and grandpop. He would say – God bless you, love you, keep the faith and say your prayers.

Funeral services will be private to family Tuesday, July 21 at 10 a.m. at Assumption Church. Guests are welcome to attend the burial immediately following at 11:15 a.m. at Assumption Cemetery – 73 Greens Farms Road, Westport.

In lieu of flowers, please make a contribution to:  Assumption Church.