Tuesday, July 16, 2024

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Hybrid Plan Official, but Important Elementary Decision Remains

Many working parents said having to switch each week would be confusing and make it near impossible to find reliable child care.

To seek a solution, Scarice said he and his administration are going to survey parents over the next three days, and that will probably decide which plan they go with.

“We want kids for two hours and 45 minutes a day … We want them in a.m. and p.m.,” he said, but it didn’t matter to school officials how they arranged alternating mornings and afternoons among families.

“We will conduct a parent survey … We will just have the lingering question to answer of how to make it equitable,” he said.

“Is this a strict referendum?” asked BOE member Lee Goldstein. “Whatever gets the most votes — is what we’re doing?”

She said it was impossible to compare the problems that will face individual families with each respective scenario.

Chair Candice Savin couldn’t directly answer her question, but suggested, “There may be an obvious preference in the community” which the survey would reveal.

No one said what they would do if the results were split.

Comments poured in so fast Monday night following the discussion and preceding the vote that John Bayers, director of human resources and general administration, could hardly keep up with reading them aloud.

They ranged from several that kindly acknowledged the difficulty of achieving equity, to one that called the proceedings “the biggest waste of time, taxes and resources I’ve ever seen.”

Probably the two most noteworthy emails received by the BOE came from “Amanda Huggenkiss” and “I. M. Madnow,” but the latter was deemed too inappropriate to read aloud.

Many working parents said having to switch each week would be confusing and make it near impossible to find reliable child care.

To seek a solution, Scarice said he and his administration are going to survey parents over the next three days, and that will probably decide which plan they go with.

“We want kids for two hours and 45 minutes a day … We want them in a.m. and p.m.,” he said, but it didn’t matter to school officials how they arranged alternating mornings and afternoons among families.

“We will conduct a parent survey … We will just have the lingering question to answer of how to make it equitable,” he said.

“Is this a strict referendum?” asked BOE member Lee Goldstein. “Whatever gets the most votes — is what we’re doing?”

She said it was impossible to compare the problems that will face individual families with each respective scenario.

Chair Candice Savin couldn’t directly answer her question, but suggested, “There may be an obvious preference in the community” which the survey would reveal.

No one said what they would do if the results were split.

Comments poured in so fast Monday night following the discussion and preceding the vote that John Bayers, director of human resources and general administration, could hardly keep up with reading them aloud.

They ranged from several that kindly acknowledged the difficulty of achieving equity, to one that called the proceedings “the biggest waste of time, taxes and resources I’ve ever seen.”

Probably the two most noteworthy emails received by the BOE came from “Amanda Huggenkiss” and “I. M. Madnow,” but the latter was deemed too inappropriate to read aloud.

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